Modular Startup

INFO

For more information on the previous Modular Startup used in ServiceStack v5.x see our Legacy Modular Startup docs

Taking advantage of C# 9 top level statements and .NET 6 WebApplication Hosting Model, ServiceStack templates by utilize both these features to simplify configuring your AppHost in a modular way.

Program.cs becomes a script-like file since C# 9 top level statements are generating application entry point implicitly.

var builder = WebApplication.CreateBuilder(args);

var app = builder.Build();

// Configure the HTTP request pipeline.
if (!app.Environment.IsDevelopment())
{
    app.UseExceptionHandler("/Error");
    app.UseHsts();
    app.UseHttpsRedirection();
}

app.Run();

The application AppHost hooks into startup using HostingStartup assembly attribute. In ServiceStack templates, this uses the file name prefix of Configure.*.cs to help identify these startup modules.

All ServiceStack's features are loaded using .NET's HostingStartup, including ServiceStack's AppHost itself that's now being configured in Configure.AppHost.cs, e.g:

[assembly: HostingStartup(typeof(MyApp.AppHost))]

namespace MyApp;

public class AppHost : AppHostBase, IHostingStartup
{
    public void Configure(IWebHostBuilder builder) => builder
        .ConfigureServices(services => {
            // Configure ASP .NET Core IOC Dependencies
        })
        .Configure(app => {
            // Configure ASP .NET Core App
            if (!HasInit)
                app.UseServiceStack(new AppHost());
        });

    public AppHost() : base("MyApp", typeof(MyServices).Assembly) {}

    public override void Configure(Container container)
    {
        // Configure ServiceStack only IOC, Config & Plugins
        SetConfig(new HostConfig {
            UseSameSiteCookies = true,
        });
    }
}

The use of Modular Startup does not change the AppHost declaration, but enables the modular grouping of configuration concerns. Different features are encapsulated together allowing them to be more easily updated or replaced, e.g. each feature could be temporarily disabled by commenting out its assembly HostingStartup's attribute, including ServiceStack itself:

//[assembly: HostingStartup(typeof(MyApp.AppHost))]

INFO

Reason for only conditionally registering ServiceStack with if (!HasInit) is to allow other plugins (like Auth) the opportunity to precisely control where ServiceStack is registered within its preferred ASP .NET Core's pipeline

Module composition using mix

This has enabled ServiceStack Apps to be easily composed with the features developers need in mind. Either at project creation with servicestack.net/start page or after a project's creation where features can easily be added and removed using the command-line mix tool.

.NET 6's idiom is incorporated into the mix gist config files to adopt its HostingStartup which is better able to load modular Startup configuration without assembly scanning.

This is a standard ASP .NET Core feature that we can use to configure Mongo DB in any ASP .NET Core App with:

x mix mongodb

Which adds the mongodb gist file contents to your ASP .NET Core Host project:

using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Hosting;
using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;
using MongoDB.Driver;

[assembly: HostingStartup(typeof(MyApp.ConfigureMongoDb))]

namespace MyApp
{
    public class ConfigureMongoDb : IHostingStartup
    {
        public void Configure(IWebHostBuilder builder) => builder
            .ConfigureServices((context, services) => {
                var mongoClient = new MongoClient();
                IMongoDatabase mongoDatabase = mongoClient.GetDatabase("MyApp");
                services.AddSingleton(mongoDatabase);
            });
    }    
}

As it's not a ServiceStack feature it can be used to configure ASP .NET Core Apps with any feature, e.g. we could also easily configure Marten in an ASP .NET Core App with:

x mix marten

The benefit of this approach is entire modules of features can be configured in a single command, e.g. An empty ServiceStack App can be configured with MongoDB, ServiceStack Auth and a MongoDB Auth Repository with a single command:

x mix auth auth-mongodb mongodb

Likewise, you can replace MongoDB with a completely different PostgreSQL RDBMS implementation by running:

x mix auth auth-db postgres

ConfigureAppHost

Looking deeper, we can see where we're plugins are able to configure ServiceStack via the .ConfigureAppHost() extension method:

[assembly: HostingStartup(typeof(MyApp.ConfigureAuth))]

namespace MyApp
{
    // Add any additional metadata properties you want to store in the Users Typed Session
    public class CustomUserSession : AuthUserSession
    {
    }
    
    // Custom Validator to add custom validators to built-in /register Service requiring DisplayName and ConfirmPassword
    public class CustomRegistrationValidator : RegistrationValidator
    {
        public CustomRegistrationValidator()
        {
            RuleSet(ApplyTo.Post, () =>
            {
                RuleFor(x => x.DisplayName).NotEmpty();
                RuleFor(x => x.ConfirmPassword).NotEmpty();
            });
        }
    }

    public class ConfigureAuth : IHostingStartup
    {
        public void Configure(IWebHostBuilder builder) => builder
            .ConfigureServices(services => {
                //services.AddSingleton<ICacheClient>(new MemoryCacheClient()); //Store User Sessions in Memory Cache (default)
            })
            .ConfigureAppHost(appHost => {
                var appSettings = appHost.AppSettings;
                appHost.Plugins.Add(new AuthFeature(() => new CustomUserSession(),
                    new IAuthProvider[] {
                        new CredentialsAuthProvider(appSettings),     /* Sign In with Username / Password credentials */
                        new FacebookAuthProvider(appSettings),        /* Create App https://developers.facebook.com/apps */
                        new GoogleAuthProvider(appSettings),          /* Create App https://console.developers.google.com/apis/credentials */
                        new MicrosoftGraphAuthProvider(appSettings),  /* Create App https://apps.dev.microsoft.com */
                    }));

                appHost.Plugins.Add(new RegistrationFeature()); //Enable /register Service

                //override the default registration validation with your own custom implementation
                appHost.RegisterAs<CustomRegistrationValidator, IValidator<Register>>();
            });
    }
}

By default, any AppHost configuration is called before AppHost.Configure() is run, the AppHost can be further customized after its run:

[assembly: HostingStartup(typeof(MyApp.ConfigureAuthRepository))]

namespace MyApp
{
    // Custom User Table with extended Metadata properties
    public class AppUser : UserAuth
    {
        public string ProfileUrl { get; set; }
        public string LastLoginIp { get; set; }
        public DateTime? LastLoginDate { get; set; }
    }

    public class AppUserAuthEvents : AuthEvents
    {
        public override void OnAuthenticated(IRequest req, IAuthSession session, IServiceBase authService, 
            IAuthTokens tokens, Dictionary<string, string> authInfo)
        {
            var authRepo = HostContext.AppHost.GetAuthRepository(req);
            using (authRepo as IDisposable)
            {
                var userAuth = (AppUser)authRepo.GetUserAuth(session.UserAuthId);
                userAuth.ProfileUrl = session.GetProfileUrl();
                userAuth.LastLoginIp = req.UserHostAddress;
                userAuth.LastLoginDate = DateTime.UtcNow;
                authRepo.SaveUserAuth(userAuth);
            }
        }
    }

    public class ConfigureAuthRepository : IHostingStartup
    {
        public void Configure(IWebHostBuilder builder) => builder
            .ConfigureServices(services => services.AddSingleton<IAuthRepository>(c =>
                new OrmLiteAuthRepository<AppUser, UserAuthDetails>(c.Resolve<IDbConnectionFactory>()) {
                    UseDistinctRoleTables = true
                }))
            .ConfigureAppHost(appHost => {
                var authRepo = appHost.Resolve<IAuthRepository>();
                authRepo.InitSchema();
                // CreateUser(authRepo, "admin@email.com", "Admin User", "p@55wOrd", roles:new[]{ RoleNames.Admin });
            }, afterConfigure: appHost => 
                appHost.AssertPlugin<AuthFeature>().AuthEvents.Add(new AppUserAuthEvents()));

        // Add initial Users to the configured Auth Repository
        public void CreateUser(IAuthRepository authRepo, string email, string name, string password, string[] roles)
        {
            if (authRepo.GetUserAuthByUserName(email) == null)
            {
                var newAdmin = new AppUser { Email = email, DisplayName = name };
                var user = authRepo.CreateUserAuth(newAdmin, password);
                authRepo.AssignRoles(user, roles);
            }
        }
    }
}

Customize AppHost at different Startup Lifecycles

To cater for all plugins, AppHost configurations can be registered at different stages within the AppHost's initialization:

public void Configure(IWebHostBuilder builder) => builder
    .ConfigureAppHost(
        beforeConfigure:    appHost => /* fired before AppHost.Configure() */, 
        afterConfigure:     appHost => /* fired after AppHost.Configure() */,
        afterPluginsLoaded: appHost => /* fired after plugins are loaded */,
        afterAppHostInit:   appHost => /* fired after AppHost has initialized */);

Removing Features

The benefits of adopting a modular approach to AppHost configuration is the same as general organizational code structure which results in better decoupling and cohesion where it's easier to determine all the dependencies of a feature, easier to update, less chance of unintended side effects, easier to share standard configuration amongst multiple projects and easier to remove the feature entirely, either temporarily if needing to isolate & debug a runtime issue by:

// [assembly: HostingStartup(typeof(MyApp.ConfigureAuth))]

Or easier to permanently replace or remove features by either directly deleting the isolated *.cs source files or by undoing mixing in the feature using mix -delete, e.g:

x mix -delete auth auth-db postgres

Which works similar to package managers where it removes all files contained within each mix gist.

INFO

Please see the Mix HowTo to find out how you can contribute your own gist mix features

Migrating to HostingStartup

As we'll be using the new HostingStartup model going forward we recommend migrating your existing configuration to use them.

To help with this you can refer to the mix diff showing how each of the existing mix configurations were converted to the new model.

As a concrete example, lets take a look at the steps used to migrate our Chinook example application from NET5 using the previous Startup : ModularStartup, to .NET 6 HostingStartup.

Step 1

Migrate your existing ConfigureServices and Configure(IApplicationBuilder) from Startup : ModularStartup to the top-level host builder in Program.cs. Eg

var builder = WebApplication.CreateBuilder(args);
var app = builder.Build();

// Configure the HTTP request pipeline.
if (!app.Environment.IsDevelopment())
{
    app.UseExceptionHandler("/Error");
    // The default HSTS value is 30 days. 
    // You may want to change this for production scenarios, see https://aka.ms/aspnetcore-hsts.
    app.UseHsts();
    app.UseHttpsRedirection();
}

app.Run();

Step 2

Move your AppHost class to a new Configure.AppHost.cs file.

Step 3

Implement IHostingStartup on your AppHost with automatic initialization. Eg:

public void Configure(IWebHostBuilder builder)
{
    builder.ConfigureServices(services => {
            // Configure ASP.NET Core IOC Dependencies
        })
        .Configure(app => {
            // Configure ASP.NET Core App
            if (!HasInit)
                app.UseServiceStack(new AppHost());
        });
}

Step 4

Declare assembly: HostingStartup for your AppHost in the same Configure.AppHost.cs. Eg:

[assembly: HostingStartup(typeof(Chinook.AppHost))]

Step 5

Migrate each existing modular startup class that implements IConfgiureServices and/or IConfigureApp to use IHostingStartup. Eg:

// net5.0 modular startup
using ServiceStack;

namespace Chinook
{
    public class ConfigureAutoQuery : IConfigureAppHost
    {
        public void Configure(IAppHost appHost)
        {
            appHost.Plugins.Add(new AutoQueryFeature {
                MaxLimit = 1000,
                IncludeTotal = true
            });
        }
    }
}
// net6.0 modular startup using IHostingStartup
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Hosting;
using ServiceStack;

[assembly: HostingStartup(typeof(Chinook.ConfigureAutoQuery))]

namespace Chinook
{
    public class ConfigureAutoQuery : IHostingStartup
    {
        public void Configure(IWebHostBuilder builder)
        {
            builder.ConfigureAppHost(appHost =>
            {
                appHost.Plugins.Add(new AutoQueryFeature {
                    MaxLimit = 1000,
                    IncludeTotal = true
                });
            });
        }
    }
}

Remembering also that infrastructure like your Dockerfile or host will likely need the runtimes/SDKs updated as well.