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Testing

The tests in ServiceStack.WebHost.Endpoints.Tests show good examples of how to create stand-alone integration tests that just use a self-hosted HttpListener AppHost.

Example Stand-alone Integration tests

Integration Testing

The CustomerRestExample.cs shows an example of a stand-alone integration test. Integration tests in ServiceStack just involves starting a standard self-host ServiceStack Instance when the Test Fixture Starts up and disposing it when it tears down. Your integration tests can then communicate with the self-host exactly the same as if it were a remote ServiceStack instance (since that’s all it is), e.g:

//Create your ServiceStack AppHost with only the dependencies it needs
public class AppHost : AppSelfHostBase
{
    public AppHost() : base("Customer REST Example", typeof(CustomerService).Assembly) {}

    public override void Configure(Container container)
    {
        container.Register<IDbConnectionFactory>(c => 
            new OrmLiteConnectionFactory(":memory:", SqliteDialect.Provider));

        using (var db = container.Resolve<IDbConnectionFactory>().Open())
        {
            db.CreateTableIfNotExists<Customer>();
        }
    }
}

//Add Service Contract DTO's and Data Models
[Route("/customers", "GET")]
public class GetCustomers : IReturn<GetCustomersResponse> {}

public class GetCustomersResponse
{
    public List<Customer> Results { get; set; } 
}

[Route("/customers", "POST")]
public class CreateCustomer : IReturn<Customer>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Customer
{
    [AutoIncrement]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public string Name { get; set; }
}

//Implement your Service Contracts
public class CustomerService : Service
{
    public object Get(GetCustomers request)
    {
        return new GetCustomersResponse { Results = Db.Select<Customer>() };
    }

    public object Post(CreateCustomer request)
    {
        var customer = new Customer { Name = request.Name };
        Db.Save(customer);
        return customer;
    }
}

//Write your Integration tests
[TestFixture]
public class CustomerRestExample
{
    const string BaseUri = "http://localhost:2000/";
    ServiceStackHost appHost;

    [TestFixtureSetUp]
    public void TestFixtureSetUp()
    {
        //Start your AppHost on TestFixtureSetUp
        appHost = new AppHost() 
            .Init()
            .Start(BaseUri);
    }

    [TestFixtureTearDown]
    public void TestFixtureTearDown()
    {
        //Dispose it on TearDown
        appHost.Dispose();     
    }

    /* Write your Integration Tests against the self-host instance */

    [Test]
    public void Can_GET_and_Create_Customers()
    {
        var client = new JsonServiceClient(BaseUri);

        //GET /customers
        var all = client.Get(new GetCustomers());
        Assert.That(all.Results.Count, Is.EqualTo(0));

        //POST /customers
        var customer = client.Post(new CreateCustomer { Name = "Foo" });
        Assert.That(customer.Id, Is.EqualTo(1));

        //GET /customers
        all = client.Get(new GetCustomers());
        Assert.That(all.Results.Count, Is.EqualTo(1));
    }
}

Unit testing

If you want to unit test a ServiceStack Service in isolation there are a couple of different approaches you can take. The base Service class itself is just a simple C# class which lets you define and inject dependencies manually or by using the built-in IOC container.

We’ll illustrate both approaches using this simple unit test example that tests this simple Service:

// DTOs
public class FindRockstars
{
   public int? Aged { get; set; }
   public bool? Alive { get; set; }
}

public class GetStatus
{
   public string LastName { get; set; }
}

public class RockstarStatus
{
   public int Age { get; set; }
   public bool Alive { get; set; }
}

public class Rockstar
{
   [AutoIncrement]
   public int Id { get; set; }
   public string FirstName { get; set; }
   public string LastName { get; set; }
   public int? Age { get; set; }
}

// Implementation
public class SimpleService : Service
{
   public IRockstarRepository RockstarRepository { get; set; }

   public List<Rockstar> Get(FindRockstars request)
   {
      return request.Aged.HasValue
          ? Db.Select<Rockstar>(q => q.Age == request.Aged.Value)
          : Db.Select<Rockstar>();
   }

   public RockstarStatus Get(GetStatus request)
   {
      var rockstar = RockstarRepository.GetByLastName(request.LastName);
      if (rockstar == null)
          throw HttpError.NotFound("'{0}' is not a Rockstar".Fmt(request.LastName));

      var status = new RockstarStatus
      {
          Alive = RockstarRepository.IsAlive(request.LastName)
      }.PopulateWith(rockstar); //Populates with matching fields

      return status;
   }
}

This Service provides 2 operations, FindRockstars which makes db queries directly in the service class itself, and GetStatus which uses a repository instead for all its Data access.

Using an in-memory database

If you’re accessing Db from directly within your service implementation you’re going to want to make use of a real DB given the ADO.NET IDbConnection requires a lot of effort to mock. You can do this in the same way you would register your dependencies in ServiceStack itself, by using the built-in IOC. For a unit test we can do this without an AppHost by just use a new Container in your TestFixtureSetup, e.g:

Test Setup

private ServiceStackHost appHost;

[TestFixtureSetUp]
public void TestFixtureSetUp()
{
    appHost = new BasicAppHost().Init();
    var container = appHost.Container;

    container.Register<IDbConnectionFactory>(
        new OrmLiteConnectionFactory(":memory:", SqliteDialect.Provider));

    container.RegisterAutoWiredAs<RockstarRepository, IRockstarRepository>();

    container.RegisterAutoWired<SimpleService>();

    using (var db = container.Resolve<IDbConnectionFactory>().Open())
    {
        db.DropAndCreateTable<Rockstar>();
        db.InsertAll(SeedData);
    }
}

[TestFixtureTearDown]
public void TestFixtureTearDown()
{
    appHost.Dispose();
}

With everything setup we can now test the service just like a normal C# class in isolation independently of ServiceStack itself:

[Test]
public void Using_in_memory_database()
{
    //Resolve the autowired service from IOC and set Resolver for the base class
    var service = appHost.Container.Resolve<SimpleService>(); 

    var rockstars = service.Get(new FindRockstars { Aged = 27 });

    rockstars.PrintDump(); //Print a dump of the results to Console

    Assert.That(rockstars.Count, Is.EqualTo(SeedData.Count(x => x.Age == 27)));

    var status = service.Get(new GetStatus { LastName = "Vedder" });
    Assert.That(status.Age, Is.EqualTo(48));
    Assert.That(status.Alive, Is.True);

    status = service.Get(new GetStatus { LastName = "Hendrix" });
    Assert.That(status.Age, Is.EqualTo(27));
    Assert.That(status.Alive, Is.False);

    Assert.Throws<HttpError>(() =>
        service.Get(new GetStatus { LastName = "Unknown" }));
}

Manually injecting dependencies

If you prefer your unit tests not to use an in-memory database, you can instead choose to mock your dependencies. In this example we’ll use a stand-alone Mock, but you can reduce boilerplate by using mocking library like Moq instead.

public class RockstarRepositoryMock : IRockstarRepository
{
    public Rockstar GetByLastName(string lastName)
    {
        return lastName == "Vedder"
            ? new Rockstar(6, "Eddie", "Vedder", 48)
            : null;
    }

    public bool IsAlive(string lastName)
    {
        return lastName == "Grohl" || lastName == "Vedder";
    }
}

[Test]
public void Using_manual_dependency_injection()
{
    var service = new SimpleService
    {
        RockstarRepository = new RockstarRepositoryMock()
    };

    var status = service.Get(new GetStatus { LastName = "Vedder" });
    Assert.That(status.Age, Is.EqualTo(48));
    Assert.That(status.Alive, Is.True);

    Assert.Throws<HttpError>(() =>
        service.Get(new GetStatus { LastName = "Hendrix" }));
}

This example doesn’t need a container as we’re injecting all the dependencies manually.

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